Chemical elements
  Carbon
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Application
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
      Methane
      Ethylene
      Acetylene
      Coal-Gas
      Carbon Tetrafluoride
      Tetrafluoromethane
      Carbon Tetrachloride
      Tetrachloromethane
      Carbon Tetrabromide
      Tetrabromomethane
      Carbon Tetraiodide
      Tetraiodomethane
      Carbon Oxychloride
      Carbonyl Chloride
      Phosgene
      Carbon Oxybromide
      Carbonyl Bromide
      Carbon Suboxide
      Carbon Monoxide
      Carbon Dioxide
      Percarbonic Acid
      Carbamic Acid
      Carbamide
      Urea
      Carbon Disulphide
      Carbonyl Sulphide
      Carbon Oxysulphide
      Thiocarbonyl Chloride
      Thiocarbonic Acid
      Thiocarbamic acid
      Thiourea
      Thiocarbamide
      Perthiocarbonates
      Carbon Monosulphide
      Carbon Subsulphide
      Carbon Sulphidoselenide
      Carbon Sulphidotelluride
      Carbon Nitrides
      Cyanogen
      Dicyanogen
      Hydrocyanic Acid
      Prussic Acid
      Cyanogen Chloride
      Chlorocyanogen
      Cyanogen Bromide
      Bromocyanogen
      Cyanogen Iodide
      Iodocyanogen
      Polymerised Cyanogen Halides
      Cyanamide
      Cyanic Acid
      Cyanuric Acid
      Cyamelide
      Fulminic Acid
      Thiocyanic Acid
      Sulphocyanic Acid
      Isoperthiocyanic Acid
      Cyanogen Sulphide
      Thiocyanic Anhydride
    Diamonds
    Graphite
    Amorphous Carbon
    Coal

Carbon Tetraiodide, CI4






Carbon Tetraiodide, CI4, results from the interchange of chlorine and iodine when carbon tetrachloride reacts with aluminium or boron iodide. It may be prepared by dropping a solution of the tetrachloride in carbon bisulphide on to aluminium iodide at 0° C.:

3CCl4 + 4AlI3 = 4AlCl3 + 3CI4.

Lantenois prepares this compound by heating lithium iodide with excess of carbon tetrachloride in a vacuum in a sealed tube at 90°-92° C. for five days. The best solvents for carbon tetraiodide are benzene, acetone, and carbon disulphide. It crystallises in dark red, regular octahedra, having a density of 4.32. When exposed to air it begins to decompose, producing carbon dioxide and iodine; it has no melting-point, but from 50° C. onwards decomposes into its elements. Carbon tetraiodide is attacked by hydrogen at 100° C., the chief product being iodoform; alcoholic potassium hydroxide at 30°-40° C. also produces iodoform. Oxygen forms carbonyl iodide with liberation of iodine even in the dark. Carbon tetraiodide is estimated by means of its reaction with 20 per cent, silver nitrate solution, carbon monoxide and dioxide being evolved in the proportion of 3 to 1 by volume.


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